Tag Archive: map


In my search for Open Source GIS programs, I stumbled across something called OSGeo Live, which was considered a geospatial package tool, mentioned in a website.  Not ever hearing about anything like this before, I decided to research what it is since I am always looking for new geospatial tools and softwares to experiment with for GIS purposes.   After searching through the web, I came across OSGeo Live’s website (http://live.osgeo.org/en/index.html).  It seemed fascinating that I could use a wide variety of open source geospatial software without installing anything (A list installed softwares can be found at http://live.osgeo.org/en/overview/overview.html).  So I thought to myself, “Let’s give it a try!”

Once I downloaded the application and extracted it (which is about 2.7GB) it had a file extension I never heard of before <*.7z> and that my computer did not recognize.  This ended up needing to be open in a WinZip like application called 7zip.  Once I unzipped this file download, another file extension popped up that my computer did not recognize, nor did I recognize it: <*.vmdk>  –  So again, I was on a search to figure out this file extension since I was walking into a new world of applications, softwares, file extensions, that I have never dealt with before.  After this research, I came across what it was – VMware Virtual Disk File.  In order to open this I needed a Virtual Desktop.  I searched in Google’s search engine “what is the best virtual machine application” and I came across a website that listed VirtualBox (https://www.virtualbox.org/) as the number one choice with a description from http://lifehacker.com/5714966/five-best-virtual-machine-applications as follows:

“VirtualBox has a loyal following thanks to a combination of a free-as-in-beer price tag, cross-platform support, and a huge number of features that make running and maintaining virtual machines a breeze. Virtual machine descriptions and parameters are stored entirely in plain-text XML files for easy portability and easy folder sharing. Its “Guest Additions” feature, available for Windows, Linux, and Solaris virtual machines, makes VirtualBox user friendly, allowing you to install software on the virtual machine that grants extra privileges to the host machine for tasks like sharing files, sharing drives and peripherals, and more.”

Then follows the steps to get it started: http://live.osgeo.org/en/quickstart/virtualization_quickstart.html

Once inside of the virtual machine for OS Geo Live, perform the following functions before getting started in any of the programs:

  1. Click on Applications/System/Terminal ;
  2. Type sudo su to become a super-user
  3. Update your APT database with sudo apt-get update, and typing your password, if requested;
  4. Install the latest security updates with sudo apt-get upgrade;
  5. Install required packages with sudo apt-get install build-essential module-assistant;
  6. Configure your system for building kernel modules by running sudo m-a prepare;
  7. Click on Install Guest Additions… from the Devices menu, then choose to browse the content of the CD when requested.
  8. type sudo apt-get install linux-headers-‘uname -r‘
  9. type cd /media/VBOXADDITIONS_4.2.6_82870/
  10. type sudo ./VBoxLinuxAdditions.run
  11. type mkdir <name of your shared drive folder>
  12. type sudo mount -t vboxsf -o uid=user,rw <name of your shared drive folder> /home/user/<name of your shared drive folder>

Another option for the a virtual machine is the free VMWare Player (http://www.vmware.com/products/player/?src=WWW_BestMatch_US#utm_source=WWW_BestMatch_US&utm_medium=src&utm_campaign=src-tagged-url).  The same aforementioned website provided the following description:

“VMware for desktop users comes in two primary flavors: VMware Player and VMware Workstation. VMware Player is a free solution aimed at casual users who need to create and run virtual machines but don’t need advanced enterprise-level solutions. VMware Workstation includes all the features of VMWare Player—easy virtual machine creation, hardware optimization, driver-less guest OS printing—and adds in the ability to clone machines, take multiple snapshots of the guest OS, and a replay changes made to the guest OS for testing software and recording the results within the virtual machine.”

I also came across another GIS virtual desktop called GISVM (Geographic Information System Virtual Machine) which can be founded at http://gisvm.com/- I will give this a try at a latter date and then compare the two GIS virtual desktops.

Animated Atlas of African History

New and interesting concepts of using maps to tell stories through animation.

“This map gives a year-by-year presentation of selected themes in the history of Africa between 1879 and 2002.”

MapStory : Animated Atlas of African History | Geospatial Human Geography | Scoop.it

http://mapstory.org/maps/171

 

I came across the following site that has a wealth of free information on Geographic Information Systems'(GIS)-related information by Berry & Associates // Spatial Information Systems (BASIS).  Map Analysis is a great subject for anyone interested in analyzing maps especially through GIS. A link to the material is http://www.innovativegis.com/basis/

There are presentation slides in the "Online Books and Materials: Map Analysis Workshop Materials" by Joseph K. Berry that go over various topics in the workshops presented such as Introduction and Data Considerations, Spatial Analysis Techniques and Considerations, Spatial Statistics Techniques and Considerations, GIS Modeling Approachesand Considerations , among others.

There is also a free online book which can be downloaded that covers a wealth of topics such as Spatial Interpolation Procedures and Assessment, Where Is GIS Education?, Analyzing Accumulation Surfaces, Linking Data Space and Geographic Space, Analyzing Landscape Patterns, Applying Surface Analysis,  Human Dimensions of GIS, Overview of Spatial Analysis and Statistics, Spatial Data Mining in Geo-business and much more.
A link to the book can be found here: http://www.innovativegis.com/basis/mapanalysis/

Happy Reading!

Maps can tell a great story without words, especially by showing a temporal depiction of the change of cultures and boundaries. Throughout history though, various empires conquered many lands across most of Asia and left behind many cultural influences that have molded today’s ethnic groups and languages in the region.

There are three main language families in this region depicted in the below map: Semitic (Yellow), Indo-Iranian (Orange), and Turkic (Green).

Semitic language roots trace back to the days of the Sumerians and Akkadians estimated around 2400 BC. These languages have evolved over time into the most commonly known languages of Arabic (commonly used in all Arab States), Hebrew (commonly used in Israel), Amharic (commonly used in Ethiopia), and Tigrinya (commonly used in Eritrea).

Indo-Iranian language roots trace back to 6th century BC. Indo-Iranian is most commonly known today as the Persian language family consisting of mainly Kurdish, Farsi, Pashto, Tajik, and Dari. Other Indo-Iranian languages are located in Pakistan and India.

Turkic language roots trace back to the early Middle Ages (around 8th century AD). Before the Turkic expansion occurred, most Turks were located in the Area known as Mongolia today. In the years following the early Middle Ages, the Turks expanded in all parts of Asia from Siberia to India to Turkey covering a vast land mass and influencing many cultures along the way. Today, Turkish, Azerbaijani, and the languages of the former Soviet republics in Central Asia make up what is part of the Turkic family.

The following maps are courtesy of the Gulf/2000 Project funded by Columbia University:

Linguistic Composition of Southwest Asian States: Present Day

The following group of maps reveals historic changes as a result of the various conquerors, empires, and cultures from 1450 to 2000 AD. Throughout the years, the only long standing empires have been the Ottoman/Turkey and Persia/Iran.

Islamic States ca. AD 1450
Islamic States ca. AD 1510
Islamic States ca. AD 1550
Islamic States ca. AD 1625
Islamic States ca. AD 1700
Islamic States ca. AD 1750
Islamic States ca. AD 1800
Islamic States ca. AD 1840
Islamic States ca. AD 1850
Islamic States ca. AD 1900
Islamic States ca. AD 1925
Islamic States ca. AD 1950
Islamic States ca. AD 2000

Link to Blog posting by Brain Pickings titled

The Greatest Grid: How Manhattan’s Famous Street Map Came to Be

Maps and old photos of Manhattan

All:  If you live in the United States, please take this survey sponsored by the American Geographic Society.  You do not have to like geography to take it 🙂

Survey: Geographic Attitudes and Perceptions by Adults

For some reason, the history of placenames is starting to interest me.  Maybe its because of the cultural effects that have had some affect on society today?  Who knows…but it’s a good notion how how cultures influence other cultures.

The Migration of Place Names: Africa, Libya, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Sudan

Good points on when maps shouldn’t be maps #GIS #geography

When Maps Shouldn’t Be Maps

Interesting concept…what are your thoughts?

Google Maps Rolls Out Indoor Mapping

I know this is old news, but I wish there was a law regarding common sense!  Obviously no map is a 100 % accurate – it’s a guide people!!!

Woman Sues Google After She Follows Google Maps Directions And Gets Hit By A Car

desktop explorer

Geography and stuff for Urbanists

ImagerySpeaks

Where Industry Discovers Geospatial Image Analysis

Mapoholic

High on maps and GIS

GeoBuzz

Stay in the know

The GeoChristian

The Earth. Christianity. They go together.